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Pesticides harm babies – 1 December 23, 2008

Posted by paripl110707 in Brain Abnormalities, Dangerous, Dengue, Feces of fetuses, Harmful Effects, Insect-borne disease, Malaria, Nervous System, Poisonous.
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Because of dengue, malaria and other insect-borne diseases, many of us have little choice but to use pesticides. Pesticides are found in our air, water, soil and food sources. But many pesticides have harmful effects on the environment, and in a recent study, pesticides have been revealed to be extremely dangerous for children, especially fetuses and infants.

“Most pesticides are poisonous to the nervous system and abnormalities in brain development in the fetus have been described in animals and humans who have been exposed to them,” says Dr. Enrique M. Ostrea Jr., professor of Pediatrics at Wayne State University in Michigan and visiting professor of the College of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) at the University of the Philippines in Manila. Dr. Ostrea became known for his creative use of meconium (feces of fetuses) to detect drug use in their mothers, and for this and other achievements, he is included in my book “Ten Outstanding Filipino Scientists.”

Now Dr. Ostrea focuses his attention on pesticides. The fetus is especially vulnerable to pesticides, because while in the womb, the brain undergoes very rapid development. Nerve cells increase, migrate, form networks. To make things worse, even smaller doses of pesticides can be dangerous for the fetus, because it cannot quickly break down poisons. No wonder, research has shown that several learning and behavioral disorders may be traced to even low-level exposure to pesticides in industry and in the home.

 

Ref: dailyinquirer

Vital Facts about Vitamins – 3 November 23, 2008

Posted by paripl110707 in Broiled Ground Beef, Broiled Salmon, Energy Release, Healthy Skin, Lean, Lower Blood Cholesterol, Nervous System, Roasted Chicken Breast, Roasted Peanuts, Waterpacked Tuna.
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Niacin

Vital for energy release from foods.  Important for healthy skin, mouth and nervous system.  Sometimes used to help lower blood cholesterol.

 

peanuts

                                                                                             

                                                                     How Much?

Where?                                           % U.S. RDA

Tuna, waterpacked, 3 oz                                55 %

Chicken breast, roasted, 3 oz                         59 %

Salmon, broiled, 3 oz                                      28 %

Peanuts, roasted, ¼ c                                      26 %

Ground beef, lean, broiled, 3 oz                     21 %

 

Vital Facts About Vitamins – 2 November 22, 2008

Posted by paripl110707 in Energy Release Form Foods, Nervous System, Vitamin B1.
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Thiamin

Vitamin B1

Helps to keep the nervous system healthy.  Vital for energy release form foods.

 

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How Much?

Where?                                     % U.S. RDA

Pork loin, lean, broiled, 3 oz                   55 %

Cheerios cerreal, 1 oz                             25 %

Peanuts, roasted, ¼ c                               16 %

Peas, cooked, ½ c                                     14 %

Whole-wheat bread, slice                          7 %

Vitamins for All November 10, 2008

Posted by paripl110707 in Basic Element, Carbohydrates, Fats, Nervous System, Protein, Uncategorized, Vitamin Complex.
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vitamins

Vitamins are complex chemical substances contained mainly in food. They enable the body to break down and use the basic elements of food, proteins, carbohydrates and fats. Certain vitamins are also involved in producing blood cells, hormones, genetic material and chemicals in your nervous system. Unlike carbohydrates, proteins and fats, vitamins and minerals do not provide calories. However, they do help the body to use the energy from food.

Most vitamins cannot be made in your body, so they must be acquired from food. One exception is vitamin D, which is made in the skin when it is exposed to sunlight. Bacteria present in the gut can also make some vitamins.